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November 17, 2018
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So, your toddler finally had some teeth out. Moment of your life, isn’t it? It’s not only important to have the teeth grown, it is only the beginning. You need to look after those little milk teeth as well. It is always a good practice to begin early so as not to face the consequences later, as the time goes by. Here are some tips on how to take care of your toddler’s oral health recommended by the top pediatricians from Children’s Dentistry of Chattanooga.

Get a checkup.

First things first. Get your toddler a dental checkup by his first birthday. It is a good practice to take care of your child’s oral health early so as to save you money in the long run. Reports claim that dental costs are as low as 40 percent than the dental costs of a child who visits the dentist for the first time when he is 5. You can do the math.

Teach your toddler good and healthy habits.

Brushing is of course, important from the very beginning. Before your infant has teeth, you can brush their gums gently. Wet the baby toothbrush or gently clean them with a soft cloth. When the teeth finally make an appearance, brush them twice a day with a baby toothbrush and fluoridated toothpaste. Begin with the flossing when the adjacent teeth make an appearance. Consult his/her dentist for more.

Keep your child bay from the baby bottle decay.

Never put your child to sleep with a bottle of juice or milk. You need to keep away the sugary liquids as they tend to cling to the teeth which feed on the bacteria and causes tooth decay. Put your child to sleep with a bottle of water only.

Cut back on the juice and other sugary liquids.

Some parents believe that consuming juice is healthy for the lifestyle, yes it is. But it can lead to tooth decay in the long run. Make sure you do not let your child consume more than 4 ounces of 100 percent fruit juice. Give your kids non-sugary drinks and food during mealtimes and juice only as a treat.

Have the hold on the sippy cup.

Sure, a sippy cup helps a child move from a bottle to a glass, but if you prolong it, it may lead to decay on the back of front teeth if the liquids contained in the cup are sugary.

Samuel Jacob

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